Former Gov. Paul LePage holds a town hall meeting at Biddeford Middle School in 2017. (Photo by Derek Davis/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images)

During his tenure as the Governor of Maine, Tea Party Republican Paul LePage made national news several times for his casually racist comments—he once referred to "people of color or people of Hispanic origin" as "the enemy right now." And he has slowed down none since leaving office.

Now living in Florida, LePage frequently calls in or guests on conservative radio and TV programs like the Ingraham Angle.

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Despite efforts to pressure electoral college members to switch their votes to honor the popular vote count, electors chose to seat Donald Trump, a result Congress will ratify next month. While efforts were fervent, they were always unlikely to persuade enough electors to switch their votes. In fact, there has never been a revolt by the College in its entire history.

The New York Times issued a widely circulated op-ed yesterday favoring an end to the electoral college. Although Trump, it wrote, “won under the rules… the rules should change so that a presidential election reflects the will of Americans and promotes a more participatory democracy.” The electoral college, it wrote, “is more than just a vestige of the founding era; it is a living symbol of America’s original sin.” Through the infamous three-fifths compromise, slaves counted towards the electoral college votes of each state, but they were not allowed to vote.  Thus, while a direct popular vote would have placed the Southern states at a disadvantage, the electoral college advantaged them. In large part because of this, seven out of eight of the first U.S. Presidents hailed from a Southern slave-holding state, Virginia, which commanded a massive number of electoral votes.

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