Prime Minister Theresa May has confirmed that she will seek to form a government in coalition with Northern Ireland's Democratic Unionist Party (DUP) after the Conservatives failed to secure a parliamentary majority in yesterday's snap general election. Conservatives won 318 seats, short of the 326 needed for a majority, leaving the UK with a hung Parliament. Political analysts credited high turnout among young voters and a passionate campaign by Jeremy Corbyn, the Labour Party leader.

Speaking in Downing Street after receiving the Queen's permission to form a government, May said, “What the country needs more than ever is certainty, and having secured the largest number of votes and the greatest number of seats in the general election, it is clear that only the Conservative and Unionist party has the legitimacy and ability to provide that certainty by commanding a majority in the House of Commons. Our two parties have enjoyed a strong relationship over many years, and this gives me the confidence to believe that we will be able to work together, in the interests of the whole United Kingdom."

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April 4 was an excellent day for Illinois Democrats. Democratic candidates won seats in unexpected places, from township supervisor to town councils, in traditionally strong Republican regions. The Illinois victories are another indicator that the GOP may find itself struggling in the 2018 congressional elections.

Dan Kovats, Executive Director of the Illinois Democratic County Chairmen’s Association, responded to the victories, saying, "We had a pretty good day. We won in areas we normally would win, but we also won in areas Republicans never expected us to be competitive in. They were caught flat-footed."

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Americans shocked by the election of Donald Trump made their opposition known through large-scale protests, walkouts, and marches across major US cities yesterday. Minorities, LGBTs, the disabled, and women fearful of what a Trump presidency will mean for their lives and communities helped lead the actions in the San Francisco Bay Area, Los Angeles, Seattle, Portland, Pittsburgh, Chicago, and New York, among other cities in predominantly blue states that voted heavily against Trump.

Thousands of protesters in Chicago took to the streets to yell "Not my President" and "F--- Trump" outside Trump International Hotel & Tower. In New York, thousands of demonstrators chanted and banged drums as they marched up Sixth Avenue.

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As news of the growing likelihood of a surprise upset by Donald Trump reached traders in Asia, markets there plunged nearly six percent. By the time his victory was all but certain, they had pushed down the dollar, spiked the price of safe havens such as gold, and punished the Mexican peso by bringing it to record low levels.

European markets followed suit, with major markets in Frankfurt, Milan and London shedding between two and three percentage points. Markets pared their losses somewhat following Trump's acceptance speech.

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[DIGEST: ThinkProgress, Nature, Scientific American]

With the US presidential election less than a month away, many voters want to know each candidate’s stance on scientific matters. The blanket term “science” is broad, covering anything from STEM education policies to allocating funding for biomedical research. Recently, the nonprofit organization Science Debate reached out to each party’s candidate, to hear their stance on the “most pressing” scientific issues currently in the media landscape.

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[DIGEST: Politico, ABC]

Donald Trump's attempt to appeal to African-American voters in Flint, Michigan, went awry when the pastor of a historically black church took the stage to remind him that he was not there to give a political speech. The pastor interrupted Trump as he disparaged Hillary Clinton, his Democratic opponent.

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[DIGEST: ABC, Reuters]

Donald Trump issued an unprecedented apology for his campaign’s past rhetoric while speaking to a crowd in Charlotte, North Carolina, yesterday. “Sometimes, in the heat of debate and speaking on a multitude of issues, you don’t choose the right words or you say the wrong thing," Trump said. "I have done that, and I regret it, particularly where it may have caused personal pain. Too much is at stake for us to be consumed with these issues." The apology comes as the Republican presidential candidate attempts to rebound after several weeks of negative press coverage and recent polls indicating he trails behind Hillary Clinton, his Democratic competitor, in every key battleground state.

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