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Mark Zuckerberg, chief executive officer and founder of Facebook Inc. attends the Viva Tech start-up and technology gathering at Parc des Expositions Porte de Versailles on May 24, 2018 in Paris, France. (Photo by Christophe Morin/IP3/Getty Images)

On July 31, via their online newsroom, Facebook Head of Cybersecurity Policy, Nathaniel Gleicher, announced:

About two weeks ago we identified the first of eight Pages and 17 profiles on Facebook, as well as seven Instagram accounts, that violate our ban on coordinated inauthentic behavior."

The announcement by Gleicher falls under a subheading of "What We've Found So Far" in Facebook's full announcement, "Removing Bad Actors on Facebook." According to the announcement:

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U.S. President Donald Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin speak to the media during a joint press conference after their private meeting on July 16, 2018 in Helsinki, Finland. (Photo by Chris McGrath/Getty Images)

During Thursday's Aspen Security Forum, Tom Burt, Microsoft's VP of Customer Security & Trust, warned the crowd that hacks, like those during the 2016 elections by Russian government operatives, continue to happen. Three midterm candidates already suffered cyber attacks from Russian hackers.

In 2016, Burt said his team discovered fake Microsoft domain names used by the Russian hacking groups —given code names like Scrontium, APT28, Fancy Bear and Pawn Storm— used to "phish" information from unsuspecting campaign staffers.

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More than one million women report being stalked every year. Given the number of cases that likely go unreported, the number is no doubt even higher. While online stalking -- or cyberstalking -- still remains a somewhat understudied crime, the number of reports related to online harassment are increasing. The effects of stalking on the victim are significant. Victims experience anxiety, insomnia, social dysfunction and depression. They are also more likely to be victims of physical violence and homicide. A full 85 percent of female attempted homicide victims were stalked prior to being attacked.

Earlier this month in the 8-1 decision Elonis v. United States, the United States Supreme Court rejected the standard used by the overwhelming majority of appellate courts in prosecuting federal cyberstalking crimes. In so doing, the Court made it harder for victims of online threats to achieve justice.

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