HOUSTON, TX - FEBRUARY 05: Duron Harmon #30 of the New England Patriots tackles Devonta Freeman #24 of the Atlanta Falcons in the first half of Super Bowl 51 at NRG Stadium on February 5, 2017 in Houston, Texas. (Photo by Tom Pennington/Getty Images)

[DIGEST: New York Times (1, 2, 3, 4), New England Cable News, JAMA Network, Boston Globe]

In a new study testing the brains from 202 deceased football players—ranging from high school to the NFL—87 percent tested positive for chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). CTE is a degenerative disease linked to repeated blows to the head that causes symptoms such as confusion, memory loss, depression and dementia. Symptoms often arise years after causation. Specifically, 111 of those brains studied belonged to NFL players, of which 110 had CTE.

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[DIGEST: The New York Times, ESPN, NPR]

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) recently announced a seven-year, $16 million grant to research chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). The NFL will not provide any of that money, despite having pledged $30 million toward CTE research in 2012.

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