ABC News

As more information becomes available regarding the virus that's caused a public health crisis in the United States, officials at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have urged Americans in hard-hit areas to begin wearing cloth masks to cover their faces.

Unlike medical professionals, who need N95 masks (of which there is a shortage) when treating virus patients, average Americans can wear makeshift cloth masks that block the saliva droplets through which the virus is spread.

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Win McNamee/Getty Images // Aurelien Morissard/IP3/Contributor/Getty Images

President Donald Trump raised eyebrows earlier this week when he found a way to blame his predecessor, former President Barack Obama, for a shortage in COVID-19, or novel coronavirus, tests.

Trump claimed the shortage was due to an unspecified Obama-era rule.

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Officials at the Center for Disease Control and Prevention are facing criticism from a Florida woman after they permitted her to take a domestic flight, despite showing flu-like symptoms and visiting Italy, where new cases of the novel coronavirus continue to emerge.

Upon arriving in New York, the woman warned CDC officials about her condition, but they told her that she didn't pose a risk and allowed her to proceed to the connecting flight towards her Florida destination.

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Two months after it emerged in Wuhan, China, the coronavirus has spread throughout Asia, the Middle East, Latin America, North America, and sub-Saharan Africa with nearly 84,000 cases worldwide.

The United States is scrambling to prepare for an outbreak that officials have deemed inevitable—but President Donald Trump and his staff are saying the concern is overblown.

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Despite the growing threat of the rapidly-spreading coronavirus, President Donald Trump has taken repeated steps to dismiss the need for widespread drastic action to contain an outbreak in the United States that experts have deemed inevitable.

But how could a President possibly benefit from being cavalier about a pandemic?

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The headlines began in 2014: Formerly healthy children contracted what seemed to be a minor upper respiratory infection and were suddenly paralyzed — sometimes one limb, sometimes multiple limbs, sometimes permanently.

Parents and experts wondered if it could be a brand-new virus, West Nile disease, or even a mutated version of polio, which hadn’t been seen in the U.S. since the late 1970s.

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Think twice about hooking up: STD rates are at an all-time high. Worse, the latest STD making the rounds could literally make your genitals rot off. Donovanosis, also known as granuloma inguinale, is a sexually transmitted infection that turns a person’s genitals into flesh-eating ulcers. It can also infect the mouth, nose, and chest.

The disease has typically been reported in warm, humid regions including India, southern Africa, central Australia, and the Caribbean, but cases have also appeared in cooler climates. The CDC records about 100 cases in the U.S. each year. This summer, the U.K. saw a rash of cases as well.

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