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The state of Georgia was a major target of former President Donald Trump's lie that the 2020 election was "stolen" from him through widespread fraud orchestrated by Democrats.

The Peach State went blue for the first time in a presidential election since 1992 and went on to deliver Democrats a majority in the Senate with a pair of key runoff victories.

Amid all of this, Trump tried to intervene on his own behalf, calling Georgia's Republican Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger and other local officials, urging them to "find" the exact number of votes he needed to win.

As history will remember, Trump lost Georgia, so it's no surprise that he supported Georgia's recently-passed S.B. 202—a voter suppression bill that forces ID requirements for absentee ballots, limits the number of ballot drop-off boxes per county, effectively bans delivering water or food to voters in long lines, and introduces a host of other measures designed to limit access to the ballot.

When Georgia Republican Governor Brian Kemp signed the bill into law late last month, he and Georgia's Republican legislators were met with intense backlash from across the country, and some of this backlash even came from corporations.

Major League Baseball announced it would be relocating its all-star game out of Atlanta in response to the bill. Delta Air Lines, based in Atlanta, condemned S.B. 202 and vowed to work against it—as did soda titan Coca-Cola.

In a statement, Trump wrote:

"For years the Radical Left Democrats have played dirty by boycotting products when anything from that company is done or stated in any way that offends them. Now they are going big time with WOKE CANCEL CULTURE and our sacred elections.

After railing against so-called "cancel culture" he called on his followers to boycott companies who spoke out against the bill—including Coca-Cola.

It is finally time for Republicans and Conservatives to fight back—we have more people than they do—by far! Boycott Major League Baseball, Coca-Cola, Delta Airlines, JPMorgan Chase, ViacomCBS, Citigroup, Cisco, UPS, and Merck."

The move raised eyebrows, not because it was atypical for Trump to rail against any person or entity he believes slighted him, but because Trump's love of Coca-Cola produces—especially Diet Coke—is fairly well-established.

Sure enough, only three days after Trump issued the statement, Stephen Miller—avowed white supremacist and Trump's immigration advisor—tweeted a photo with the former President.

But neither of the two subjects were the stars of the photo.

An enhanced version of the photo shows what appears to be a glass coke bottle hidden behind Trump's office phone.

People weren't necessarily surprised to see it.





Adding insult to injury, it appeared the beverage was deliberately hidden.




Awkward.