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Months after President Joe Biden's inauguration, a diminishing number of former President Donald Trump's supporters believe Trump has a master plan to regain the presidency or even that he's still secretly operating as President.

Like corrupt preachers promising the rapture, right-wing media personalities and online conspiracy theorists keep moving the goalposts on when Trump will supposedly expose the Deep State, resulting in mass arrests and his reinstatement as President.

On January 20—Inauguration Day—theories circulated that Trump would use the emergency broadcast system to deliver orders to his supporters, and that he would expose Biden's purported crimes against humanity and retake the White House.

When that didn't happen, the new date became March 4, citing fantasies that the U.S. secretly became a corporation in the 1870s and that all Presidents after that were illegitimate. Trump would supposedly announce the return to the "real" America on March 4—the country's original inauguration date before the passage of the 20th Amendment.

Obviously that didn't happen, but now Trump is allegedly giving an alternate timeline to his associates, claiming he'll be "reinstated" by August.

New York Times reporter Maggie Haberman—who broke some of the most consequential developments of the Trump administration throughout his time in office—confirmed this is what Trump was telling people.



It's still in question whether Trump is trying to keep his public support alive by sowing conspiracy theories, or if he is actually under the delusion that he could be reinstated. Haberman claimed that Trump has been "laser focused" on continued election audits forced by Republican legislatures.

People had questions.




Some are certain it's another grift, while others think Trump is truly that unwell.





Some believe Trump's latest fantasy will result in yet another failed insurrection like Americans saw on January 6.



Trump has yet to comment on the matter on his blog, but he continues to promote election conspiracy theories.