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NRA Slammed for Tweeting Out the Second Amendment in the Wake of Boulder Massacre

Chet Strange/Getty Images // Joe Raedle/Getty Images

The United States saw another deadly mass shooting on Monday, this time in Boulder, Colorado. The shooter killed 10 people, including a police officer, in a supermarket before being taken into custody.

The atrocity comes just days after another gunman in Atlanta, Georgia terrorized three massage parlors in the area, targeting and killing six Asian American women along with two other people.

The shooting in Boulder was the seventh mass shooting in seven days, according to CNN.

These tragedies have reinvigorated discussions around the gun violence epidemic in the United States that's already killed more Americans since 1968 than every single U.S. war combined.

But for years, even moderate gun law reform has proven impossible in the United States, largely thanks to the Republican Party and the influence of the National Rifle Association (NRA).

Despite its purported misuse of donor funds, the NRA remains one of the most powerful lobbies in politics, with millions of members and virtually unlimited coffers. It's donations are courted by some of the country's most influential Republican politicians.

Its bastardization of the Second Amendment has radicalized countless Americans into thinking that any safety measure—be it licensing, background checks, AR-15 bans, or magazine capacity limits—is an attempt by the government to take their guns.

And immediately after news of the Boulder Massacre broke, the NRA once again tweeted out the Second Amendment, a tacit insistence that there must be mass shootings almost every day in the United States if we are to be free.

The insensitive tweet was reviled across social media.






Americans across the country want to see the NRA—and its stranglehold on the American government—dissolved.



The NRA recently filed for bankruptcy, but plans to reincorporate in Texas.