Donald Trump Just Showed Reporters a Piece of Paper He Claims Contains His Agreement With Mexico, and the Jokes Came Rolling In

President Donald Trump holds a piece of paper he said was a trade agreement with Mexico, while speaking to the media before departing from the White House on June 11, 2019 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

At the end of May, President Donald Trump announced he would enact substantial tariffs against the United States' largest trading partner, Mexico, if they did not take steps to stop migrants from reaching the United States' southern border. The initial threat drew backlash from both sides of the border.

But nine days later Trump declared victory and announced via Twitter a deal was made and the heavily criticized tariffs canceled. But Mexican officials refuted Trump's claim stating the agreement he said his tariffs threat spawned had actually been proposed months prior.


In response to the fact-check by Mexico, the President began talking about extra as yet undisclosed concessions by Mexico that he won. But Mexican officials disputed that claim as well.

So on Tuesday, June 11, President Trump showed proof of his hard won secret extras promised  by Mexico to avoid his 5% tariffs.

Watch the President reveal his proof here.

The proof came in the form of a folded piece of paper. The President declined to show any of the cameras what was on the paper.

Trump stated:

"I'm going to let Mexico do the announcement at the right time."

But people questioned what, if anything, was actually on the paper that related to any added agreements from Mexico.

Despite the dramatic announcement, the President drew more jeers than cheers as people guessed what was actually on the sheet of paper.

President Trump found few who believed his claims.

Photographers on scene got a closer look.

The closer look seemed to also refute the President's claims.

Meanwhile, Mexico's Foreign Affairs Minister reiterated that his country has nothing additional to announce as no new agreement was made beyond what they proposed months before President Trump's tariff threat.

Abdulhamid Hosbas/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images; Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Government Executive—"government's business news daily and the premier digital destination for senior leaders in the federal government's departments and agencies"—reported news from the White House that many suspected but which is now confirmed.

The Trump administration is making concerted efforts to purge the civil service of any employees not loyal to President Donald Trump.

Keep reading...
Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images // Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

Since the disco era of the 70s, the Village People have been a mainstay on dance floors, in arenas, and virtually every other gathering.

You'd be hard-pressed to find a person who doesn't know the YMCA dance or the chorus to Macho Man.

Even President Donald Trump has used their songs in his rallies—most recently on his visit to India, where over 100,000 people watched the President enter to Macho Man, much to the glee of his supporters.

Keep reading...
BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP via Getty Images // Seung-il Ryu/NurPhoto via Getty Images

As the coronavirus pandemic spreads through Asia, the Middle East, and Europe, concerns are growing that President Donald Trump's administration isn't doing enough to prepare for the virus coming to the United States.

Trump's Health and Human Services department was criticized this week for only requesting $2.5 billion in emergency aid—a sum that lawmakers feared wouldn't cover the supplies and services needed to contain the virus.

Keep reading...
BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP via Getty Images // MANDEL NGAN/AFP via Getty Images

President Donald Trump's constant Twitter commentary about the Roger Stone case has made an already chaotic, years-long proceeding into an even greater circus.

Trump's former campaign advisor Roger Stone was convicted by a jury of his peers on numerous felony charges, including lying to Congress and obstructing justice. The Justice Department took the nearly unprecedented step of overriding its own prosecutors' sentencing recommendation after Trump tweeted in his former advisor's defense.

All four prosecutors resigned as a result. Stone was sentenced to three years and four months in prison.

Keep reading...
Samuel Corum/Getty Images

Senator Marco Rubio (R-FL) took a break from tweeting bible verses to chastise the performances of Democratic presidential candidates in Tuesday night's debate.

It didn't go as well as he'd hoped.

Keep reading...
C-SPAN/YouTube

For many years, the so-called miracle on ice was a point of pride for people in the United States.

A group of amateur college hockey players faced off against the Soviet Union's Red Army champions in the 1980 Olympics in Lake Placid, New York.

Keep reading...