Bernie Sanders Is Trolling Trump With His New OpEd Explaining Why Incarcerated Felons Should Be Able to Vote

Manny Carabel/WireImage, Adam Bettcher/Getty Images

Bernie Sanders has campaigned long and hard for incarcerated criminals to have the right to vote. Sanders took a tongue-in-cheek shot at Trump in his latest op-ed, saying that even felons like Paul Manafort and Michael Cohen deserve the right to vote.

Sanders has come under fire recently for his comments advocating voting rights for the incarcerated. He believes that every American over the age of 18 deserves the right to help shape our democracy - and that includes incarcerated felons.


Many other Democrats support a much less controversial policy. Presidential candidate Beto O'Rourke and former San Antonio Mayor Julián Castro have both suggested that they would support voting rights for non-violent offenders, but that criminals like the Boston Marathon Bomber should not be eligible.

But Sanders believes that "[...] the right to vote is inherent to our democracy. Yes, even for terrible people." Even if those terrible people include felons like Paul Manafort and Michael Cohen, two of Trump's cronies who have recently been convicted of crimes.

In a USA Today op-ed, Sanders doubled-down on his proposed policy changes. "If we are serious about calling ourselves a democracy, we must firmly establish that the right to vote is an inalienable and universal principle that applies to all American citizens 18 years and older. Period."

"Even if Trump’s former campaign manager and personal lawyer end up in jail," Sanders added, in a jab at the current administration's legal troubles, "they should still be able to vote — regardless of who they cast their vote for."

Many Twitter users did not agree with Sanders' controversial views on inmate voting.

"It goes without saying that someone who commits a serious crime must pay his or her debt to society," Sanders said. "But punishment for a crime, or keeping dangerous people behind bars, does not cause people to lose their rights to citizenship. It should not cause them to lose their right to vote."

"Our present-day crisis of mass incarceration," Sanders said, "has become a tool of voter suppression."

Sanders pointed out that states such as Vermont and Maine already allow inmates to vote. "This is not a radical idea," he said. "Voting rights for all citizens is a basic principle of democracy."

"I have been attacked in recent days by President Trump and others for my conviction that people who are incarcerated should be given the right to vote," said Sanders. "I make no apologies for that position."

Michael Cohen and Paul Manafort should thank him.

Drew Angerer/Getty Images

The health crisis in the United States continues to worsen in the face of the global pandemic, passing the 100,000 mark of confirmed virus cases—just days after earning the grim distinction of having more cases than any other country in the world.

Due to a dire shortage of lifesaving medical equipment, governors across the country are imploring the federal government to invoke its powers to compel private companies to manufacture more equipment and oversee distribution of what's already available.

Keep reading... Show less
Drew Angerer/Getty Images

The saying "While the cat's away the mice will play" refers to people taking advantage of the absence of oversight to do as they like. While that is an apt description for what is happening now with the Trump administration using the public's focus on the global pandemic to roll back environmental protections, perhaps a better saying is "The inmates are running the asylum."

In other words, those least capable of running a group or organization are now in charge.

Keep reading... Show less
Photo by Erin Schaff-Pool/Getty Images // Senate Television via Getty Images

In the face of the public health crisis that's upended daily life in the United States, the historical impeachment trial of President Donald Trump—which ended on February 5—feels like a lifetime ago, despite captivating. a nation as late as last month.

One of the chief criticisms of the Republican party during the proceedings was the claim that Democrats were trying to undo an election that was only months away, out of fear that Trump would be reelected.

Keep reading... Show less

Rocco DeLauri Sr./YouTube

President Donald Trump, his administration, and his allies continue to accuse the media of promoting hysteria even as the pandemic that has taken over the United States claims over 93,000 cases and 1,400 deaths.

Keep reading... Show less
MANDEL NGAN/AFP via Getty Images

At a recent press briefing on the current health crisis facing the United States, President Donald Trump's pandemic response coordinator, Dr. Deborah Birx, made a highly misleading claim.

Birx said that "almost 40 percent" of the country had experienced a low level of spread of the virus despite having early casesk.

Keep reading... Show less
Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

As the national health crisis in the United States continues to worsen, New York has quickly become the epicenter of the pandemic in the United States.

New York City alone has over 20,000 confirmed cases of the virus, and the state's death toll skyrocketed by 110% in just 36 hours this week. The urgency is only exacerbated by a shortage of crucial ventilators to combat the respiratory virus.

Keep reading... Show less