The 'Trump Slump' Is Now a Thing and It's Costing the U.S. $4.6 Billion a Year

President Donald Trump acknowledges the media as he walks to the residence after disembarking from Marine One on the South Lawn of the White House on March 19, 2017 in Washington, DC. (Pete Marovich-Pool/Getty Images)

Travel to the U.S. steadily declined since President Donald Trump took office in 2017. The latest report shows the "Trump Slump" caused $4.6 billion in lost spending and 40,000 jobs.

The latest data from the National Travel and Tourism Office shows a 3.3 percent fall in travel spending and a 4 percent drop in international travel to the United States.


The Trump Slump caused America to lose its long held spot as the world's second most popular country for foreign travel, falling behind Spain. France maintained its top spot.

Experts say Trump's proposed travel bans and anti-immigrant speeches, policies and Tweets negatively impacted the U.S.'s reputation as a destination for foreign visitors.

A weaker dollar and heightened security measures also played a role.

Adam Sacks, the president of Tourism Economics, posited a theory for the decline.

It’s not a reach to say the rhetoric and policies of this administration are affecting sentiment around the world, creating antipathy toward the U.S. and affecting travel behavior.”

The U.S. Travel Association plans to launch a “Visit U.S.” lobbying campaign to encourage leaders in Washington to embrace the economic impact of foreign tourists.

While the U.S. government has been the source of a lot negative media attention this year, the travel industry must continue to stand for open borders, inclusivity and the celebration of diversity."

"We are optimistic that this trend can and will turn around," said Leigh Barnes, the regional director for Intrepid Travel.

Meanwhile Twitter reacted to the news as well.

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