Joe Scarborough Ranted That Donald Trump Spends Most of His Time 'Watching Cable News and Tweeting' and Trump Proved Him Right Almost Immediately

(FILES) In this file photo taken on January 31, 2019 US President Donald Trump waits for a meeting with China's Vice Premier Liu He in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, DC. - Donald Trump's typical day starts late and is spent mostly watching TV, browsing newspapers and tweeting, according to a leak of the president's confidential schedule. The weekend report on news site axios.com angered the White House, which did not deny the details of what appears to be a rather easy typical day at the office for the world's most powerful man. Most days, Trump has no official work before 11:00 am, according to the daily guidance given to the media by the press office. That usually begins with the president receiving his intelligence briefing. (Photo by Brendan Smialowski / AFP) (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)

MSNBC host Joe Scarborough on Monday torched President Donald Trump's work ethic after another round of private presidential schedules were leaked over the weekend.

Records released by Axios on Sunday show that Trump spent 50 percent of four days last week enjoying unstructured "Executive Time."


Trump insists that the executive time isn't spent relaxing, but Scarborough ridiculed Trump's chest-pounding as "an absolute joke," citing previous reports that also show Trump as having huge blocks of free time every morning.

“We’ve seen one account after another, one person working for Trump after another, saying he often just hunkers down upstairs in the personal quarters,” Scarborough said on Morning Joe. “He spends the majority of his time watching cable news and tweeting, yelling, staring at TV sets like an old man that is in a retirement home instead of a president of the United States who is supposed to be working 24 hours a day.”

Scarborough wasn't done comparing Trump, 72, to a listless retiree living in a home.

“I’m sure most older men in retirement homes live far more active lives than does Donald Trump,” Scarborough said. “But for these people that come out and suggest, and for Donald Trump to suggest he’s worked harder than most any president before him is just an absolute joke.”

Scarborough, a former GOP Congressman, did concede that Trump was number one at something.

“Historians will record, when this presidency is over, that Donald Trump was the laziest president ever to occupy the Oval Office,” Scarborough said, “And did less work than any other president to ever to occupy the Oval Office, full stop.”

Watch below:

Minutes later, Trump responded to Scarborough on Twitter.

"No president ever worked harder than me (cleaning up the mess I inherited)!" Trump whined.

It backfired spectacularly. Trump was clearly watching television.

We are not stupid.

Honestly, who does Trump think he is fooling?

Not these folks.

Trump has actually surpassed all of his predecessors in time spent not working, among other things.

As for that "mess" Trump inherited...

Remember when The Simpsons tried to warn us?

We remember.

Shannon Finney/Getty Images

Across the country, states have instituted stay-at-home orders in an effort to curb the spread of the highly contagious virus that's upended daily life in the United States.

Late last month, Wisconsin Governor Tony Evers issued one of these orders, urging his constituents to only leave their houses for necessary errands, such as getting groceries or filling prescriptions.

There's just one problem: Wisconsin's elections are scheduled for April 7. In addition to the Presidential primaries, Wisconsinites will vote for judicial positions, school board seats, and thousands of other offices.

The Democratic and Republican National Committees took the case to the Supreme Court, with Democrats arguing that the deadline for mailing absentee ballots should be extended by a week, to April 13, in order to facilitate voting from home.

With a Wisconsin Supreme Court Seat up for grabs on Tuesday, Republicans predictably made the case for why as few people as possible should be permitted to vote. It was a continuation of Wisconsin GOP efforts to suppress the vote, which included rejecting a demand from Governor Evers to automatically mail an absentee ballot to every resident.

The Republican majority in United States Supreme Court sided with the RNC and the election in Wisconsin will carry on as scheduled. This is despite Wisconsin being unprepared for the surge in absentee ballot requests, which leapt from a typical 250,000 to over 1.2 million in reaction to the virus. Thousands of these voters won't even receive these ballots until after the election, thereby preventing them from exercising their right to vote.

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg wrote a blistering dissent to the majority's decision, saying:

"Either [voters] will have to brave the polls, endangering their own and others' safety. Or they will lose their right to vote, through no fault of their own. That is a matter of utmost importance — to the constitutional rights of Wisconsin's citizens, the integrity of the State's election process, and in this most extraordinary time, the health of the Nation."

She was flabbergasted that her more conservative colleagues didn't think a global pandemic and national crisis was enough to justify emergency policies ensuring Wisconsinites their right to vote:

"The Court's suggestion that the current situation is not 'substantially different' from 'an ordinary
election' boggles the mind...Now, under this Court's order, tens of thousands of absentee voters, unlikely to receive their ballots in time to cast them, will be left quite literally without a vote."

A majority of the Supreme Court may not have agreed with Ginsburg, but the court of public opinion was fully on her side.





The Republican efforts indicated to some that the party cares more about maintaining control than preserving lives.




Large crowds are already gathering in Wisconsin to vote.

In a bit of devastating irony, the Supreme Court voted remotely when making its decision.

For more information about the tried and true tactic of GOP voter suppression, check out Uncounted, available here.

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