Ann Coulter Just Eviscerated Donald Trump For Caving on His Border Wall Funding, and Her Analysis Is Surprisingly On Point

Ben Gabbe and Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Far-right commentator Ann Coulter was a strong Trump supporter in 2016, but with the President's apparent step back from holding the federal budget hostage to his long-promised border wall, her support seems to be souring.

Coulter, a long time circulator of white supremacist and xenophobic rhetoric, didn't mince words when expressing her dissatisfaction with the President's decision.


She said in an interview with the Daily Caller that if the wall doesn't get built,

"Trump will just have been a joke presidency who scammed the American people, amused the populists for a while, but he’ll have no legacy whatsoever.”

It sounds like she's finally getting it.

Hear her words in the video below:

What's more, Coulter said she will not vote for Trump again if the wall doesn't materialize, continuing:

“Nor will, I think, most of his supporters. Why would you? To make sure, I don’t know, Ivanka and Jared can make money? That seems to be the main point of the presidency at this point.”

For once, Democrats agreed with Coulter.

Some thought Ann Coulter's opinions were too irrelevant to care.

While most Democrats tend to agree with criticisms of Donald Trump, there was one point of contention on their part regarding Coulter's words.

Many disagreed with the assertion that Trump wouldn't have a legacy without a border wall.

For most, Trump's legacy appears to be set in stone.

As the border wall becomes more and more of a pipe dream, maybe his base will finally begin to wake up.

Melina Mara/The Washington Post via Getty Images

The Senate undertook one of the gravest American political processes on Tuesday when the impeachment trial against President Donald Trump began in earnest as House Managers and Trump's defense team debated to set the rules for the ensuing trial.

On Wednesday, the Democratic impeachment managers began their 24 allotted hours (set over the course of three days) to make their case against Trump. Their case has cited documents, videos, and Trump's own words to create a compelling case for the removal—or at least for hearing more evidence previously withheld by the White House.

But are Republican Senators listening?

Keep reading...
C-SPAN

Late last year, the House of Representatives voted to impeach President Donald Trump on two articles:

  • Abuse of Power
  • Obstruction of Congress

Trump's allies have railed against both articles, but the obstruction of Congress charge has come under particular focus.

During its initial investigation, the House committees overseeing impeachment requested documents and witnesses from the White House, the State Department, and the Office of Management and Budget that would help get to the bottom of just what the deal was with Ukraine's foreign policy.

When they denied the House's request, the House subpoenaed the departments for the evidence. Claiming executive privilege, their subpoenas went ignored.

Keep reading...
CNN // David Corio/Redferns via Getty Images

House Impeachment Managers and President Donald Trump's defense team debated the rules for the ongoing impeachment trial in the Senate. The proceedings lasted for 13 hours and went on until around 2 o'clock in the morning.

Hours into the debate, Congressman Hakeem Jeffries (D-NY) responded to a rhetorical question from Trump attorney Jay Sekulow, who had asked "Why are we here?"

It led to a mic drop moment for Jeffries.

Keep reading...
Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

This past December, the House Judiciary Committee held a hearing where it heard from constitutional scholars and legal experts as to whether President Donald Trump's pressure on Ukraine to open politically beneficial investigations warranted impeachment.

House Democrats brought forth three witnesses who argued in favor of impeachment, and House Republicans brought one: George Washington University's public interest law chair, Jonathan Turley.

Keep reading...
PBS News Hour/YouTube

The White House Counsel is a staff appointee of the President and Vice President of the United States. Their role is to advise the President on all legal issues concerning the President and their administration.

Pat Cipollone has served as the current White House Counsel for President Donald Trump since December 2018.

Keep reading...
SAUL LOEB/AFP via Getty Images

In the current political landscape of the United States, you'd be hard-pressed to find any issue that Americans on which both sides of the ideological spectrum agree.

But it turns out that even on an issue as divisive as the impeachment of President Donald Trump, Republicans and Democrats agree on something.

Keep reading...