WATCH: Al Franken Announces Resignation Full Video Playback

Sen. Al Franken, D-Minn., attends a news conference in the Capitol on the Child Care for Working Families Act, which focuses on affordable early learning and care on September 14, 2017. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Senator Al Franken announced his resignation from the Senate after a seventh woman accused him of improper sexual conduct. Watch his full speech above. In the speech, Franken commented on how he was hopeful about the recent surge in the reporting of sexual harassment allegations would bring change. He said that some of the allegations are not true, while others he remembers "very differently."


Franken added, "I know in my heart that nothing I have done as a Senator that would bring dishonor on this committee." He then announced his resignation. He also commented on Trump's history of sexual assault and the upcoming election in Alabama and Roy Moore, who has allegedly preyed on teenage girls. Franken said he was resigning his seat, but was not giving up his voice as a citizen and an activist. His official resignation will happen in the next few weeks.

Earlier, media outlet MPR tweeted a report that Franken had decided to resign––even though the senator had not yet made an official announcement. Prior to his announcement, Jake Tapper tweeted that Franken said he believed he could no longer serve effectively.

Franken's latest accuser spoke to reporters on condition of anonymity.

“He was between me and the door, and he was coming at me to kiss me. It was very quick, and I think my brain had to work really hard to be like ‘Wait, what is happening?’ But I knew whatever was happening was not right, and I ducked,” the woman, a former staffer, told Politico. “I was really startled by it, and I just sort of booked it towards the door, and he said, ‘It’s my right as an entertainer.’”

Franken came under fire after media personality Leeann Tweeden alleged Franken forcibly kissed her without her consent as part of a rehearsal for a skit during a USO tour.

"He continued to insist, and I was beginning to get uncomfortable,” Tweeden wrote. “He repeated that actors really need to rehearse everything and that we must practice the kiss. I said ‘OK’ so he would stop badgering me. We did the line leading up to the kiss and then he came at me, put his hand on the back of my head, mashed his lips against mine and aggressively stuck his tongue in my mouth.”

Things grew steadily worse after a photograph surfaced in which Franken appeared to grope Tweeden's breasts while she was seated and sleeping. Tweeden said the photo was taken without her knowledge on the plane ride back to Los Angeles.

“I couldn’t believe it. He groped me, without my consent, while I was asleep,” she said. “I felt violated all over again. Embarrassed. Belittled. Humiliated. How dare anyone grab my breasts like this and think it’s funny?”

“He was between me and the door, and he was coming at me to kiss me. It was very quick, and I think my brain had to work really hard to be like ‘Wait, what is happening?’ But I knew whatever was happening was not right, and I ducked,” the woman, a former staffer, told Politico. “I was really startled by it, and I just sort of booked it towards the door, and he said, ‘It’s my right as an entertainer.’”

The top name to replace Franken is Tina Smith, the lieutenant governor to Minnesota Governor Mark Dayton. Smith is a former marketing professional who served as chief of staff to former Minneapolis Mayor R.T. Rybak. She worked with the mayor's office at the time when the Interstate 35W bridge collapsed in Minneapolis and played a major role during the rebuilding process.

Smith has worked with Governor Dayton since 2010 when she joined his campaign team. She served as his chief of staff before she became his running mate.

According to Politico:

Part of the reason Smith could be heading to the Senate, the sources said, is that she has indicated no interest in running for Congress in the past and would not run for the remainder of Franken’s term, which expires in 2020, in a 2018 special election.

This leaves the Democratic primary next year wide-open now that Franken has stepped down.

Abdulhamid Hosbas/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images; Joe Raedle/Getty Images

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