Most Read

MSNBC Anchor Perfectly Shuts Down Las Vegas Mayor After She Tried to Justify Re-Opening Casinos Amidst Pandemic

MSNBC // Denise Truscello/Getty Images for Circa Resort & Casino

Independent Las Vegas Mayor Carolyn Goodman was met with backlash on Wednesday when she joined the small chorus of local leaders bucking the advice of health experts to endorse a premature reopening of businesses amid the global pandemic.

Goodman made the comments in a Wednesday meeting of the Las Vegas City Council, where she dismissed the virus and called on Nevada's governor to reopen businesses in the state.


Goodman said:

"This shutdown has become one of total insanity, in my opinion, for there is no backup of data as to why we are shutdown from the start, no plan in place how to move through the shutdown or how even to come out of it."

Goodman's dismissal of the virus was panned by business leaders in Las Vegas—especially those on the famous Las Vegas strip, the unincorporated area which holds the city's most notable hotels, casinos, and shows. Goodman doesn't have jurisdiction over the Strip, and therefore doesn't have the power to issue guidance on how it conducts business.

On Tuesday, Goodman attempted to defend her decision in an interview with MSNBC's Katy Tur, but Goodman stumbled when met with facts.

Watch below.

Goodman reverted to the familiar talking point of listing less contagious diseases in an attempt to minimize the virus.

When Tur pointed out to her that this virus is far more contagious than any of the viruses Goodman listed, the Mayor responded:

"Well, we'll find out the facts afterwards, unfortunately we all do better in hindsight—

Tur interceded:

"But those are the facts. We have a death toll that proves it, we have cases around the country that prove that. Those are the facts."

Goodman remained reluctant:

"Assuming that you are correct...But we do deal in crowds and we have lived through all of these other virus, highly contagious diseases, and yet we have managed to continue to have wonderful conventions come up here—"

Tur wasn't having it:

"There's no assuming that I'm correct. Those are the numbers that are released by the federal government."

Tur continued to debunk Goodman's misleading claims about the proportion of deaths and about Goodman's continued shrugging at the threat.

People balked at Goodman's assertion that they'd "find out the facts afterwards."





Despite Goodman being able to name other diseases, people knew better.



When it comes to viral pathogens, what happens in Vegas most certainly does not stay in Vegas.