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House Dem Hires Investigator to Find Pro-Trump Rep. to Serve Him in January 6 Lawsuit

Samuel Corum - Pool/Getty Images // Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

Democratic members of Congress are still moving to hold former President Donald Trump and other Republican lawmakers accountable for embracing the election lies that led to the deadly failed insurrection against the United States Capitol on January 6.

Sadly, most congressional Republicans have fought efforts to get to the bottom of the siege. They acquitted Trump in his second Senate impeachment trial and, more recently, they blocked a bipartisan commission to investigate the Capitol Riots.

Democratic Congressman Eric Swalwell of California filed a civil suit back in March against former President Trump, Donald Trump Jr., Trump lawyer Rudy Giuliani, and Republican Congressman Mo Brooks of Alabama in an effort to hold them accountable for inciting an insurrection with their election fantasies.

But Brooks has proven too elusive to be served with the lawsuit, rejecting calls and emails, as well as evading officials looking to formally notify him.

Swalwell's attorneys even said they'd been forced to hire a private investigator to track Brooks down, writing in court documents:

"Plaintiff had to engage the services of a private investigator to attempt to serve Brooks personally — a difficult feat under normal circumstances that has been complicated further in the wake of the January 6 insurrection at the Capitol that Defendants incited."

Citing separation of powers concerns, Judge Amit Mehta won't permit U.S. Marshals to serve Brooks with the lawsuit, but did give Swalwell's team another 60 days to track him down.

Last month, Brooks railed against the accountability effort on Twitter.

But if the suit is so ridiculous, why is he afraid to face it in court?






People suspect Brooks won't be able to evade the suit for much longer.



To combat the bulwark against a Capitol Riots Commission, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) is reportedly mulling the formation of a select congressional committee.