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Trump Is Getting Dragged for Bizarre Tweet Insisting That 'Suburban Housewives' Read a Biden Hit Piece

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Despite frequent sexist attacks on his Democratic opponent and being caught on tape bragging about committing sexual assault, President Donald Trump won the votes of 61 percent of White women without a college education in the 2016 election.

But more recent polls ahead of 2020 show that Trump's support among women is eroding, and a large part of that likely has to do with his Twitter account.

Over his tenure as President, Trump has compared women to dogs and horses on his Twitter account, and told American congresswomen of color to go back to the countries they came from.

Now, in an effort to strike up fear of Democratic nominee Joe Biden in suburbia, Trump has posted yet another tweet calling into question his perception of women.

Trump urged "suburban housewives" to read an article baselessly warning that Biden's election would lead to the dissolution of suburbs.

What's more, the article Trump used to accompany the post laments an Obama-era move that helped make suburban areas more accessible to "low-income minorities."

New York Post columnist Betsy McCaughey writes:

"Starting in 2015, President Barack Obama's Department of Housing and Urban Development floated a cookie-cutter requirement for "balanced housing" in every suburb. "Balanced" meant affordable even for people who need federal vouchers. Towns were obligated to 'do more than simply not discriminate,' as a 2013 HUD proposal explained. Rather, towns had to make it possible for low-income minorities to choose suburban living and provide
'adequate support to make their choices possible.'"

McCaughey continues:

"The real barrier to suburban living is money. Living in the 'burbs isn't cheap. HUD Secretary Ben Carson told a House committee last May that 'people can only afford to live in certain places.' It's 'not because George Wallace is blocking the door.'
Biden and the equality warriors are using accusations of racism to accomplish something different. Their message is: You worked and saved to move to the suburbs, but you can't have that way of life unless everyone else can, too."

McCaughey chalks the racial homogeny in suburbs up to income, rather than racism. There isn't a mention of the role systemic racism plays in access to such prosperity and the hurdles one faces in pursuit of it.

Trump amplified the argument that, if Biden is elected, low-income people of color would be able to move in to suburbs that—according to McCaughey and apparently Trump—their presence would sully.

Trump's use of the term "suburban housewives" to apply to women living in the suburbs struck a sour note.






People noted the racist undertones in the attached article as well.



Others noted the dozens of suburban moms in Portland, Oregon who are rising to protest the secret police Trump's Department of Homeland Security unleashed among the city.

These suburban mothers formed a phalanx to protect protesters, only to be gassed by the anonymous militarized federal officers.