The tattoo in question. (Credit: Estela Martin.)

Estela Martín was testing her swimming skills during an entrance exam for the Spanish army when a male examiner noticed a black lotus flower tattooed on the upper part of her right foot. She was told she could not complete the exam because the tattoo was visible, and that it would be particularly obvious were she to wear a skirt.

The Spanish army’s rules no longer required women to don skirts, however, and Ms. Martín was fully aware of this change in policy, which was re-solidified after her expulsion. The tattoo was not visible when Ms. Martín wore trousers — her typical choice of wardrobe during her service — and she argued she was within regulations, but the examiner refused to budge in his steadfastness against her tattoo, insisting she could one day receive orders to wear a skirt.

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For some time, few people took the notion of an electric bus seriously. In 2011, Chinese automotive manufacturer BYD Co. revealed an early model at an industry conference in Belgium, and was met with laughter.

Isbrand Ho, managing director of BYD in Europe, remembered the laughter from that day directed at BYD for “making a toy,” but continued, “And look now. Everyone has one.”

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Henrietta Lacks

Henrietta Lacks’ story is only recently coming to public knowledge, which, given that her cells have benefited countless human lives and changed the course of modern medicine, is astounding. It is a wonder greater humanity did not know of her sooner, but her cellular capacities have been known within the scientific community for decades — and this is the major point of contention within her story.

The great-great-granddaughter of a slave, Lacks was born a person of little means. Her mother died when Lacks was a child, and her father abandoned her at her grandfather’s log cabin. She married a cousin with whom she grew up, and together they had five children, one of whom was developmentally impaired. She raised their first two children while her husband served the 1940s war effort as a Bethlehem steelworker; the other three followed upon his return after the war ended.

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Retired miner Eric Giedel, who suffers from black lung, visits Dr. Don Rasmussen for a cardo pluinary stress test. (Photo by Andrew Lichtenstein/Corbis via Getty Images)

Earlier this year, the Journal of the American Medical Association published a study from the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, which found 416 cases of advanced black lung disease in coal miners in central Appalachia from 2013 to 2017 — the highest cluster of cases ever seen. The institute also confirmed a 2016-2017 investigation by National Public Radio (NPR) that discovered hundreds of other cases in southwestern Virginia, southern West Virginia and eastern Kentucky.

This research indicates that black lung is returning, even as safety measures have improved over the course of decades. Dust screens and ventilation had nearly removed the disease from the U.S. in the 1990s, but these recent studies suggest otherwise in coal country.

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Anne Frank, German Jew who emigrated with her family to the Netherlands during the Nazi era. Separated from the rest of her family, she and her sister died of typhoid fever in the concentration camp Bergen-Belsen - As a 12-year old doing her homework - 1941 (Photo by ADN-Bildarchiv/ullstein bild via Getty Images)

Two previously unseen pages of Anne Frank’s diary were recently uncovered after researchers in Amsterdam were able to access the pages using digital image-processing technology. The long-standing concern was that separation of the pages might damage the integrity of the famous white-and-red plaid notebook.

The pages, which were covered by brown paper, were presented at a news conference in May.

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CITY HALL, NEW YORK, NY, UNITED STATES - 2017/09/05: Following President Donald J. Trump's decision to revoke the Obama-era DACA policy, thousands of activists rallied in Manhattan's Foley Square and marched across the Brooklyn Bridge. Before crossing the Brooklyn Bridge, a breakaway faction of the rally blocked Park Row near the Bridges's entrance and, after being ordered to vacate the street, were arrested by members of NYPD's Emergency Services Unit. Manhattan City Councilman Ydanis Rodriguez was among those detained by police. (Photo by Albin Lohr-Jones/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images)

Living in the United States without proper documentation is not easy, especially as raids on populations of immigrants living in small communities across the nation are rapidly increasing under the Trump administration’s watch.

The men and women of America’s Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) make arrests daily. North Carolina is a recent and significant example, where ICE arrested at least 40 people in the second week of April alone, according to ICE spokesman Brian Cox.

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Clinicians in an intensive care unit. (Wikimedia Commons)

Does censoring free speech come at the cost of public health?

By now, it is well understood that the Trump administration has curbed seven words from appearing in official documents prepared by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). According to a report by The Washington Post, the newly-limited words and terms are: diversity, entitlement, evidence-based, fetus, science-based, transgender and vulnerable.

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