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The headlines began in 2014: Formerly healthy children contracted what seemed to be a minor upper respiratory infection and were suddenly paralyzed — sometimes one limb, sometimes multiple limbs, sometimes permanently.

Parents and experts wondered if it could be a brand-new virus, West Nile disease, or even a mutated version of polio, which hadn’t been seen in the U.S. since the late 1970s.

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AMBOVOMBE, MADAGASCAR - MAY 23: Wild ring-tailed lemurs eat bananas in a compound belonging to an aid agency, on May 23, 2017 in Ambovombe, Madagascar. Lemurs are found only on this island. All types of lemurs are endangered due to destruction of their environment, the capture of babies as pets, and their killing as bush meat. 92% of Madagascar's population live below the poverty line on less than $2 a day. (Photo by Melanie Stetson Freeman/The Christian Science Monitor via Getty Images)

Can’t resist that juicy, ripe summer raspberry? It turns out your appetite may not be driving the show — the raspberry plant likely knows exactly what it’s doing.

Almost all fruits have seeds, and they’re designed that way for reproductive purposes; animals eat the fruit, transport the seeds internally, and — eventually — deposit them far and wide, ensuring the continuation of the plant species.

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Tornadoes are cropping up farther eastward in the U.S. than ever before, according to a study published in October in the journal Climate and Atmospheric Science.

While the Midwestern region known colloquially as “tornado alley” — parts of northern Texas into Oklahoma and Kansas into Nebraska — is still No. 1 in terms of twister frequency, tornadoes are now becoming common in Mississippi, Louisiana, Kentucky and even Missouri, Illinois, Iowa and parts of Ohio and Michigan.

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Scientists say they may have completed yet another piece of the puzzle that could lead to same-sex partners someday being able to bear genetic offspring.

However, it’s only been attempted in mice, and experts say there’s a long way to go before it could even be considered for humans.

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LAKEPORT, CA - JULY 31: West Covina firefighters pulls hose away from a horse barn that burns as the River Fire moves through the area on July 31, 2018 in Lakeport, California. The River Fire has burned over 27,000 acres, destroyed seven homes and stands at only eight percent contained. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

More bad news for firefighters and their supporters.

As if increased cancer risk, throttled internet service and lack of benefits for prisoners on the front lines of this summer’s California wildfires weren’t devastating enough, a recent study has found that more firefighters are committing suicide than dying in the line of duty.

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A anesthesiologist prepares a kidney donor in the operating room for a kidney transplant at Johns Hopkins Hospital June 26, 2012 in Baltimore, Maryland. The US Supreme Court is expected to announce their decision on the US President Barack Obama's healthcare law on June 28. AFP PHOTO/Brendan SMIALOWSKI

Few would argue with the importance of organ donation—138 million people in the U.S. have signed up as organ donors, and with more than 114 million Americans on the organ transplant waiting list as of August, the need for donors is greater than ever.

While typical complications for a recipient of a donated organ include rejection, surgery complications and infection, a recent case in the U.K. brought to light yet another risk even doctors couldn’t foresee: Donations by a woman with undiagnosed breast cancer resulted in four of the recipients of her organs contracting a “histologically similar” type of breast cancer over a period of 16 months to six years. Three out of four of them eventually died.

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US President Donald Trump in Washington, DC, on June 8, 2018. (Photo by NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images)

If you’ve ever wondered why your in-laws continue to believe the earth is flat and climate change is a hoax, scientists may have found the answer — and it has nothing to do with intelligence.

A group of developmental psychologists from the University of Rochester and UC Berkeley discovered that feedback trumps (no pun intended) facts and physical evidence when it comes to beliefs and decision making.

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